Friends

Aimée : bride to be

My gorgeous friend Aimée is marrying a wonderful man, here in Nova Scotia, in September.

In July, I travelled to Toronto with the two of them to photograph their Chinese wedding. The groom's family owns a Chinese restaurant in Scarborough, and they literally spared no expense to make it an incredible visual feast for first-timers like me. There were nearly 200 guests, a traditional tea ceremony (with lots of little red envelopes), a celebrity MC, a 10-course dinner, Aimée changed into THREE knock-out red dresses and, there a rockin' dance party at the end. Did I mention there was a TEN COURSE DINNER?

It's an experience I will never forget and I feel so honoured to have been invited to be a part of it.

Ivy June : My first go at Newborn Photography

One of my best friends and her husband spent years, thousands of dollars, and experienced endless heartache, before this little angel, Ivy June, arrived and I am so honoured to have been the one to photograph her.

We did the pictures here in my home studio on Canada Day, July 1st, 2014, at 5 days old and now Ivy June is officially my first newborn photography post.

I should note that I almost got pooped on, but I didn't even care because I LOVED photographing Ivy so much!!!!! And I'm talking major poop - like, it almost hit me in the eye.

 

 

 

 

Grilled Corn Soup with Bacon

Our amazing friend JC (who was the best man at our wedding) and his girlfriend Lea, were visiting with us last week from Edmonton. The night before they flew home, we debated heading into Halifax for dinner, however, after touring around Nova Scotia, visiting friends and family for ten days, JC and Lea were kind of tired. We collectively agreed to stay home, drink some beer, fire up the grill and play Apples to Apples.

Sent on a mission to the grocery store to buy cheddar smokies and chips, the boys, including our friend Colin, returned with a Sobeys bag full of fresh Nova Scotia corn.

Fresh corn. It's so different than canned or frozen. It's sweet, crunchy, loaded with flavour, and, with a little char from the grill tastes like summer, despite the cool nights.

So... guess what happens when five people are sitting around drinking beer, eating smokies and chips and a huge platter of grilled corn hits the table?

You guessed it.

Because everyone is already stuffed, you end up wrapping a bunch of cobs in tinfoil and putting them in the fridge. The next day, after everyone's gone home, you pull the tinfoil pack out of the fridge and ask yourself, 'What the heck am I going to do with this?'.

I did all of the above except I had an answer to the question.

'I'm going to make soup!', I said, and so, I gathered a little inspiration here, and here and then played the rest by ear.

Ha ha. Get it? Played the rest 'by ear'?

Ummmm. Ok. Here is the super delicious recipe.

 

Grilled Corn Soup with Bacon (yields about 1.25 L of soup)

5 ears of corn, husks and silks removed, grilled until corn has lots of toasty char (or roasted in oven until lots of brown bits)

5 Cups water

1 tsp sea salt

1 Tbsp butter

1 small onion, chopped

3 green onions, chopped (these are not essential - I just happened to have some growing in my garden)

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 Cup milk

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp ground black pepper

5-6 strips bacon, cooked, crumbled

- Use Season's and Suppers Steps 1, 2 and 3 (I used 1 Cup of water per ear of corn + 1 tsp sea salt in the water)

- Melt butter in a sautée pan - cook onions and garlic until just translucent - set aside 1 Cup of corn kernels - add the rest of the corn, plus the stuff you scraped from the cobs with the back of you knife, to the onions and garlic and top with corn stock and milk

- Bring to a boil then simmer 15 minutes

- Add salt and pepper then purée soup thoroughly with an immersion blender

- In batches, sieve soup into a large bowl/container through a fairly fine mesh strainer - really press on the corn solids to extract all of the soup from the pulp - discard pulp

- Add crumbled bacon plus reserved corn kernels and serve

* I like to take a cue from da Maurizio and add a drizzle of white truffle oil as a garnish. Extra flavour and richness is never a bad thing in my books.

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Traditional Cornish Pasties (or as close as you can get in Nova Scotia)

One day, not too long ago, I texted Kris, one of my oldest friends, a photo of a cheese and onion pasty I had picked up at a cute little food shop near my house.

'Look!', I typed, excitedly. 'A delicious Cornish Pasty!'.

'That's not a Cornish Pasty', came the reply.

'Oh', I wrote, rather dejected. 'Then what am I eating?!?'

And here began Kris and my eventual foray into pasty making together.

You see, my friend Kris is from Cornwall, England where the Cornish Pasty is the region's fiercely loved official dish. The story goes, that the pasty was invented for the local tin miners because they could eat them, using the crust as a handle, without having to wash their hands. Kris told me that sometimes the pasties would be filled with meat in one half and jam in the other so the miners could have lunch and dessert all in one neat little edible package.

According to Wikipedia, the Cornish Pasty accounts for 6% of the Cornish food economy, is the food most associated with Cornwall by the rest of the UK, and, in 2011 was awarded Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status by the European Union. 'In order to receive the PGI status, the entire product must be traditionally and at least partially manufactured (prepared, processed OR produced) within the specific region and thus acquire unique properties'.

In other words, the people of Cornwall take their pasties VERY seriously.

Kris says that a traditional Cornish Pasty can be made with either a flaky crust or a shortcrust - it doesn't really matter because the pastry is not the main debate. Most discussion focuses on what should go inside the pasty - skirt/chuck/flank steak, potato, swede, onion, salt and pepper and that's it - and as Kris told me 'everyone's got an opinion'. When I ask about sauce he says, 'I usually put a bit of butter inside because who doesn't love a bit of butter?'.

'What about carrot?' I ask, thinking about my mum's delicious meat pies.

'It's wrong to put carrot in' says Kris.

'Why?', I ask. 

'It's not traditional', he says.

Now, of couse, living in Nova Scotia means we can't actually make a TRUE Cornish Pasty, but we came damn close.

Kris and I drove to the Halifax Seaport Market on a sunny Saturday morning to pick up the ingredients for our pasties - potatoes, onions and turnip from Taproot Farms and a beautiful 1 pound skirt steak from Getaway Meat Mongers.

We used this recipe for the pastry except instead of 75g of shortening, we used 50g of shortening and 25g of butter. 

We eyeballed the amount of steak, potato, onion and turnip. We diced each ingredient and mixed it all together with lots of salt and pepper.

Then we rolled out our pastry.

We cut the dough into large circles and filled them with the steak mixture. We topped our steak mix with a few knobs of butter and a sprinkle of flour for thickening.

We then sealed the edges of the pastry with a little water and tried to crimp the edges like we knew what we were doing. The one on the left is my attempt, the one on the right is Kris'. Hmmm...

Brush the top of each pasty with some beaten egg and then bake at 375 for 50-60 minutes, until deep golden brown all over.

No photograph will ever do justice to the moment when Kris and I sat down in his living room, him on the couch, me on the floor, both of us ooohing and aaaahing over each and every bite of our crisp, flaky, golden pasties.

I think the thing I love most is that, not only do I now have an amazing recipe to add to my collection, but, every time I make it for the rest of my life, I will think of my friend.

New Orleans

I flew to Houston in March to visit my beautiful friend Cathy for five days. Cathy's husband Chad is a commercial airline pilot and they're based out of Houston because it's a major hub for his airline. I know one of the perks of working for a large successful airline is the free flights but wasn't I completely surprised and over-the-moon when I arrived in Texas and Cathy told me she had an overnight New Orleans adventure planned for us!! We were only in NOLA for 24 hours and I'll be honest, most of our time there was spent drinking Hurricanes and so, albeit brief, here is part one of our adventure.

Cathy and I freshly arrived in NOLA, me with the first Hurricane of the day in hand. Uh oh. (Instagram pic)

 

Jazz band playing in the middle of the street.

 

Taking a break.

 

Blue cat - It's all good!

 

Cathy taking a pic of the famous Blue Dogs for her friend Sean.

 

At the corner of Jackson Square - looked as good a place as any to stop for lunch!

 

Lunch at Muriel's on Jackson Square with Hurricane #2. I had a wicked fish dish here - Roasted Puppy Drum with Crawfish and Pecan Butter Sauce. It was fabulous.

 

Inside the atrium at Muriel's.

 

The view into one of the main dining rooms from the atrium at Muriel's.

 

Relatively new by-law around Jackson Square - so refreshing!

 

Saint Louis Cathedral

 

Buskers doin' their thang for the huge crowds.

 

This kind of street art abounds everywhere.

 

It takes all kinds to make the world go round!

 

Lacy skull mask. Where would you wear this - Mardi Gras?

 

Cathy with her mudslide in front of The French Market.

 

WTF is a Swamp Burger?!?

 

Gator PoBoys at pretty much every stall. I didn't try one.

 

Gator Sausage

 

Love the chalkboards everywhere.

 

Fried Green Tomatoes!! I shot this for my friend Dave - it's his favourite movie.

 

Poor little gators.

 

Pat O'Briens for Hurricanes. It's all downhill from here.

 

And, here we have the final shot of me before things got really out of hand. Cathy and I made a pact - what happens in NOLA stays in NOLA.

 

Messy. This is the point where I looked at Cathy and said 'I have to take my camera back to the hotel now'. We meandered our way through the streets back to the hotel and documented the rest of our evening adventure on our iPhones. Smart move. Until I lost mine. But that's another story...

 

And... we found Jesus on our way back to the hotel. Maybe it was a sign? Although at this point, neither of us would have been very good at reading signs. (Instagram pic)